Kitchen Cookware Sets Reviews and Buyer’s Guides

Hi! Welcome to Up Cooker which is a kitchen cookware sets introductions website. My name is Jason. This site was my idea that would help others find the perfect cookware for their kitchen. Unfortunately, I lack the time and budget to get each and every cookware in the market, try it out and put up a review. Nevertheless, I will be testing new cookware every now and then, uploading my take on various designs and styles. Every single cookware on this site is rated on various criteria such as functionality, design, warranty, extras, durability and more.

Feel free to browse around the site. You will find plenty of information on kitchen cookware starting from styling, to repair and maintenance. Plus, you can use my concise buying guide to select an exact cookware set style and design, suited to your existing or soon-to-be kitchen. Also, feel free to leave comments and suggestions anywhere on the site, it will only help me improve my site and serve the community better.

Cooksmark Copper Pan 10-Inch Nonstick Induction Compatible Frying Pan, Skillet, Saute Pan; Dishwasher Safe Oven Safe
Cooksmark Copper Pan 10-Inch Nonstick Induction Compatible Frying Pan, Skillet, Saute Pan; Dishwasher Safe Oven Safe

What are you cooking?

Do you hardly ever cook, are you new to cooking, do you cook just for family meals, or do you entertain a lot and consider yourself a good chef dabbling in all kinds of recipes. An assessment of your cooking skills and how much you enjoy cooking will help you decide what cookware will work for you.

How will you use the cookware?

I need: Look for:
Cookware that’s really versatile as I grow into my kitchen. Aluminum-core pieces with another metallic cooking surface (sometimes called tri-ply), or anodized aluminum.
To be able to make recipes that require shifting from the stovetop to the broiler or the oven. Stainless steel (over an aluminum or copper core-this is sometimes called tri-ply), cast iron.
To use my cookware with any recipes or ingredients, without wondering if they’ll damage the pan. Stainless steel (over an aluminum or copper core-this is sometimes called tri-ply), hard anodized aluminum.
To prepare delicate foods, like omelets or fish, without losing bits on the pan. Nonstick cookware.
Precise temperature control-I’m taking on some more advanced recipes. Coppern which heats up and cools down fast.
To make dishes that’ll simmer on the stovetop all day-comfort foods like chili or stew. Cast iron cookware is great for cooking all day-it takes longer than some pans to heat up, but it will evenly distribute heat to make long-cooking recipes well.
To really ramp up the heat when I’m cooking meat, so that I can get a great sear on my steaks. Cast iron or stainless steel (over an aluminum or copper core-this is sometimes called tri-ply), which heat up very well.
Cookware that will last for ages. Cast iron can last for decades with proper care. Copper can, too-if you are willing to have it re-tinned periodically.
High quality, chef-style cookware that looks great. Stainless steel cookware is pretty and versatile. It vies with copper for popularity in chef’s kitchens. Enameled porcelain can provide a pop of color in the kitchen.
Cookware that will help me keep calorie counts under control. Nonstick cookware-you don’t need to add oil or another high calorie fat to the pan to prevent sticking and pellet smoker.

How do you care for your kitchen gear?

Cooksmark Copper Pan 10-Inch Nonstick Induction Compatible Frying Pan, Skillet, Saute Pan; Dishwasher Safe Oven Safe
Cooksmark Copper Pan 10-Inch Nonstick Induction Compatible Frying Pan, Skillet, Saute Pan; Dishwasher Safe Oven Safe
I tend to: You’ll do well with:
Treat my cookware with kid gloves. Cookware that requires a bit of special attention, like cast iron (which requires hand washing and occasional seasoning) or copper (to look its best, it requires polishing).
Do a little work if it’s required, but I don’t want my cookware to become an additional chore. Aluminum or hard-anodized aluminum cookware-these versatile pots and pans are best hand-washed, but they don’t require extremely delicate handling.
To be honest, I’ll do the bare minimum. Dishwasher safe cookware is available, but be sure to read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Consider nonstick cookware, which is usually easy to clean.

What type of stove or cooktop will you use?

For the most part, the type of stove you have doesn’t matter, but there are a couple of points for consideration:

  • Smooth-surface ranges (no burners, all flat ceramic) need flat-bottomed pots.
  • If you’re in an apartment with an inexpensive stove, consider cookware with tough construction that will stand up to uneven heat without scorching or staining-like cast iron and drone.
  • Induction cooktops work better with magnetic stainless steel (a magnet will confirm its metal content).

Who are you cooking for?

If you’re whipping up dishes to serve yourself and one or two other people, you’ll probably opt for the smaller options in most cookware. But if your plans include a great deal of entertaining, you may choose larger cookware pieces, or multiples of key items, like stock pots and sauce pans.

All in all, this is a pretty simple and straightforward process. Selecting the right kitchen cookware sets for your specific needs and design ideas is going to take a bit of work, but moving forward with the insider tips information you’ve been able to get above you’ll be up and running with your new kitchen cookware sets – in your new kitchen – in no time whatsoever.

Next step is Kitchen Cookware Use and Care Guides

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *